Student Spotlight| Star M Keys

Star M Keys | Associates in Accounting

Star Keys, is 31 years old, She just completed her final quarter for her Associate Degree in Accounting, She plans to return in the fall and start her Bachelors in Paralegal. Star has a special needs daughter and she is eight years old.  During her time working toward her Associate degree she had to overcome death in her family, financial hardship and medical problems of her own. She has had a total of five different procedures and three major surgeries. While the road was rough trying to keep up with five classes a quarter plus be an Igniter Ambassador, she can proudly say that she is graduating Suma Cum Laude with a 4.0 GPA. Along with Online Classes, taking care of her daughter and helping classmates, she also takes care of her father who has health and medical problems.

We are proud of her for never giving up and never quitting. She knew her goals and she knew her limits and now she knows  what it takes to achieve all that she wants for her and her family. When asked about her future, Star stated:

I will continue to move forward until I have a Law Degree. That is my ultimate goal and dream and I will make sure it comes true!

Quoting Louis Sachar Holes “I’m not saying it’s going to be easy. Nothing in life is easy. But that’s no reason to give up. You’ll be surprised what you can accomplish if you set your mind to it. After all, you only have one life, so you should try to make the most of it.”

Congratulations, Star! We wish you the best of luck !

Star M Keys

Student Spotlight

 Mary Free | Associates in Criminal Investigation

Mary is 24 years old. A mother and a wife. She will be graduating with an Associates in Criminal Investigation with a 3.98 GPA. She is a die hard hockey fan. She is an Igniter Ambassador and a member of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars.  When she is not catching up on a local hockey game or doing homework, she is usually cooking or designing graphics. She can make something out of nothing, anything creative gets her attention. The most rewarding aspect in life is helping others. Mary has spent countless hours mentoring her mentee and others on Everest Online Facebook groups. 

Congratulations, Mary! We wish you the best of luck in your career!

Mary Free

 

 

“A.S.P.I.R.E.” A Study System

AspireA: Approach/attitude/arrange

  • Approach your studies with a positive attitude
  • Arrange your schedule to eliminate distractions

S: Select/survey/scan

  • Select a reasonable chunk of material to study
  • Survey the headings, graphics, pre- and post questions to get an overview
  • Scan the text for keywords and vocabulary: mark what you don’t understand

P: Piece together the parts:

  • Put aside your books and notes
  • Piece together what you’ve studied, either alone, with a study pal or group:summarize what you understand.

I: Investigate/inquire/inspect:

  • Investigate alternative sources of information you can refer to: other text books, websites, experts, tutors, etc.
  • Inquire from support professionals (academic support, librarians, tutors, teachers, experts,) and other resources for assistance
  • Inspect what you did not understand.

R: Reexamine/reflect/relay

Reexamine the content | Reflect on the material | Relay understanding

  • Reexamine: What questions are there yet to ask? Is there something I am missing?
  • Reflect: How can I apply this to my project? Is there a new application for it?
  • Relay: Can I explain this to my fellow students? Will they understand it better if I do?

E: Evaluate/examine/explore:

  • Evaluate your grades on tests and tasks: look for a pattern
  • Examine your progress: toward achieving your goals
  • Explore options: with a teacher, support professional, tutor, parent if you are not satisfied.

|Source|(http://www.studygs.net/aspire.htm)

Starting Off Right!

Start

You have an opportunity to learn more new, exciting things! Whichever course you are in, I promise there are things that you can do to make it run smoothly. Here are some tips I use for my own studies.

The Syllabus

It’s good to print or save a copy of this document to your desktop. It’s also very important that you read the document; it gives you an idea of how much time you will need to give to a particular course. For instance, some courses have light reading; others have not so light reading. If this course syllabus doesn’t have as much heavy reading, you’re more likely to know you can fit it in a smaller time slot.

If you have multiple courses, this will be a really good way to see how much time you need to give to each course.

Time Management

We understand that most of our students have jobs, families and/or other responsibilities so finding time to study is important, but it can be somewhat challenging. The easiest way to make sure you have the time to study is to make sure you take out time to study. The first step is to either write down or think about what you do throughout the week and see where you can realistically set time aside to focus on studying. Doing it on a Saturday when all of the kids are home may not be the best time to study. If you have a planned outing on a certain day, setting up time to study then may not be the best time either. Here are some suggestions:

  • The earlier in the week you study, the better. The sooner you read your chapters, the quicker you can have the information you need to post in the courses.
  • Pick realistic times for you. If Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. is the best time to study your materials and later on post your work, then do it.
  • Studying is nothing without participation. You have to post in eCollege for you work to count and for you to progress towards passing the course.

Studying

It’s all about just doing the work. Some coursework may be easier or more challenging than others, but you can do it! The key is to get an early enough start so you can ask for help if you need it. Instructors are there to help you and offer clarification on assignments. Here are some more quick tips:

  • Read the assigned chapters first, then review the lecture. If you do not understand something, write it down and email the instructor after you’ve finished studying.
  • Take a five to 10 minute break between chapters to let your brain process the information.
  • Once you’ve read the chapters and understood the material, complete your discussion posts as soon as possible so the information is still fresh in your head.
  • Complete your homework and/or quiz accordingly.

Will life happen? Of course! However, setting the strongest foundation possible will help you stay focused in your courses. Happy studying and congratulations on reaching your goals!

© Everest University Online | Written by: Danisha Bethune

The Early Bird Gets the Worm

bird_worm

Making the decision to further your education is one of the most significant decisions a person can make. When you decided to enroll in university courses, you invested in a dream, not just for your own personal accomplishments but for the legacy you will leave behind for your children and family. With such expectations, you want to make sure you do whatever you can to earn that diploma and obtain the career you have always imagined for yourself.

Here’s the thing: Everyone has a dream, and everyone wants to have that perfect career. There’s definitely competition out there, and wise students understand that. The individuals that attain professional success put in the work and earn their dreams. So, what can you do to be one of these people? The answer is simple: Gain experience early, network while you’re still an undergraduate and use the passion you already possess to drive you forward.

Gaining experience is essential to understanding not just your future career, but yourself. People sometimes come to understand that what they thought would be a great position did not fit them at all. Knowing this before you enter the job market might save you from having a mid-life crisis. Internships, volunteer opportunities, and entry-level jobs offer the chance to capture exposure within your chosen career path (plus the experience looks great on your resume). Below are some links you may find helpful in building up your background experience:

  • Monster.com COLLEGE

http://www.monstertrak.com/lp/signup/?WT.srch=1&WT.mc_n=olmsrchtrk&s_kwcid=internships|2143040419

  •  LINKEDIN

http://www.linkedin.com/studentjobs

  •  VAULT – CAREER INTELLIGENCE

http://www.vault.com

  •  INTERNSHIPS.COM

http://internships.about.com/od/internsites/tp/internsites.htm

On a social scale, most people network every day. Imagine taking just a portion of the energy you use to follow people on Facebook and aim it toward creating professional contacts. Surrounding yourself with like-minded people will immerse you in positivity and help you stay motivated. Joining professional associations — nationally and locally — will allow you to have access to the latest news and technologies available within your career field. Following these groups and networking while you’re still learning in the classroom will give you an edge because you’re already attaining knowledge from a large group of professionals. Don’t be afraid to ask those who are more proficient than you right now for guidance or mentor-ship.

Check out and join some of the associations related to your dream job using the links below:

ACCOUNTING

www.acatcredentials.org – Accreditation Council for Accountancy and Taxation (ACAT)

www.aafa.com – American Association of Finance and Accounting (AAFA)

www.aaahq.org – American Accounting Association

www.aicpa.org – American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA)

www.agacgfm.org – Association of Government Accountants (AGA)

www.isaca.org – ISACA (formerly called the Information Systems Audit and Control Association)

www.cmawebline.org – Institute of Certified Management Accountants (ICMA)

www.theiia.org – Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA)

www.imanet.org – Institute of Management Accountants (IMA)

www.nasba.org – National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA)

www.nsacct.org – National Society of Accountants (NSA)

BUSINESS

www.abwa.org– American Business Women’s Association

www.amanet.org – American Management Association

http://ama.Jobcontrolcenter.com – American Marketing Association

www.shrm.org– Society for Human Resources Management

www.hrtampa.org – HR Tampa Chapter of the Society for Human Resources Management

COMPUTER INFORMATION SCIENCE

www.asis.org – The American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T)

www.acm.org – Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)

www.icca.org – Independent Computer Consultants Association (ICCA)

www.ieee.org – Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE)

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

www.ncja.org – National Criminal Justice Association

PARALEGAL

www.nala.org– National Association of Legal Assistants and Paralegals

As you gather experience within your field, you are bound to grow as an individual and as a future professional. Start now and strive to sculpt your rresume into a work of art.

© Everest University Online | Written by: Evelyn Romans

Study Tips for Single Parents

Trust yourself. You know more than you think you do.” —Dr. Benjamin Spock, pediatrician and parenting author.Mother and Daughter Reading Together

Children do not come with directions, but each parent puts forth the best effort. As an advisor, one of the first things I ask a new student, is why he or she wishes to earn a degree. Commonly, a new student will say to improve the life of his or her children. Attending graduation, I find there is nothing like seeing the pride of a child watching mom or dad walk across the stage. Below are some tips gathered from parenting magazines, other universities, and Everest University Online students.

  • Time Management – Most successful students, especially parents, have a schedule for life and school. This starts with understanding that a full-time credit load is a full-time job. Parents should communicate the importance of school to their children, which includes the study time. Jennifer Burleson, a fourth-year Criminal Justice bachelor’s degree student says, “My children are well aware when I am studying, I am not to be bothered! Every student should schedule time frames as to not be overwhelmed or be interrupted.”
    • To Jennifer’s point, if the children are old enough, placing a schedule on the refrigerator is one way of making study time visible for the whole family. Include things, such as a block of family time will show that they are not forgotten.
    • Studying with children helps parents gain more study time while the children are awake. Creating a little competition with grades helps both child and parent with academic goals. If the children are younger, they may sit at the table coloring or working on a puzzle.
    • Keeping notes or readings on hand helps utilize time, such as when waiting at the doctor’s office or while picking up the children from school.  CourseSmart offers a mobile app for etexbooks that may be loaded onto most smart devices: http://www.coursesmart.com/go/mobile. Everest University Online also offers an e-Mobile app that allows a student to post to discussion, view her gradebook, or check course announcements (under “Everest University Online” in app store).
    • Setting a bed time for the children is important. This allows time while the children sleep, for you to complete house chores and studies. “What I usually do is wait until my children are in bed to do my school work. If I can get someone to watch my 4-year-old then I do my school work then. I will admit it is rough at times. Sometimes I do not go to bed until 1 or 2 a.m., but I get my assignments done,” says Connie Voss, third term Business associate degree student.
    • Waking an hour early is another way to gain some quiet time for studies. “I get most of my work done in the mornings while my daughters sleep,” says Lisa McMillon, third year Criminal Justice bachelor’s degree student.
  • Support Deciding to attend school is a huge commitment. Students should really consider who can be personal supporters.
    • If not done at the beginning, a student should consider having a conversation with the best supporters, so he/she knows who can be counted on for an hour of babysitting or to help pick up the kids from school.
    • Building a relationship with a student advisor also provides support. Advisors understand the resources the school offers such as tutoring, the library, and CARE Student Assistance Program (http://www.everestcares.com/). Additionally, advisors listen when a student needs to vent frustrations or needs a reminder of why he/she has deciding to take on this challenge.
    • Communicate with Instructors – Many students feel intimidated by instructors. However, instructors are humans too and a huge part of student success. Most instructors want to see their students succeed and understand that life happens. Just as it is easier to go to a close friend for help, students who develop relationships with instructors find it easier to request instructor assistance.
      • On the first day of class, a student should introduce himself/herself.
      • Additionally, a student should make note of each instructor’s office hours and phone number. With the instructors now available on Skype, it is even easier to communicate.
      • Knowing late work policies will also help. If an instructor can see that a student is making an effort, he/she is more likely to give consideration.

“For all the single parents out there furthering their education, my heart goes out to you. Congratulations and good luck,” say Connie.

Sources:

http://villagefamilymag.org/2011/11/23/8-tips-for-single-parents-going-back-to-school/

http://sas.calpoly.edu/asc/ssl/balanceschoolkids.html

http://dus.psu.edu/mentor/old/articles/070207lt.htm

© Everest University Online | Written by: Joanna Cassidy

The Twelve Days of Everest

everest-vertical-301-small

On the first day of Christmas,
Everest sent to me
A link to the ATSC.

On the second day of Christmas,
Everest sent to me
Two Webinars,
And a link to the ATSC.

On the third day of Christmas,
Everest sent to me
Three next term’s classes,
Two Webinars,
And a link to the ATSC.

On the fourth day of Christmas,
Everest sent to me
Four perfect grades,
Three next term’s classes,
Two Webinars,
And a link to the ATSC.

On the fifth day of Christmas,
Everest sent to me
Five APA cites,
Four perfect grades,
Three next term’s classes,
Two Webinars,
And a link to the ATSC.

On the sixth day of Christmas,
Everest sent to me
Six quizzes-a-taking,
Five APA cites,
Four perfect grades,
Three next term’s classes,
Two Webinars,
And a link to the ATSC.

On the seventh day of Christmas,
Everest sent to me
Seven papers-a-writing,
Six quizzes-a-taking,
Five APA cites,
Four perfect grades,
Three next term’s classes,
Two Webinars,
And a link to the ATSC.

On the eighth day of Christmas,
Everest sent to me
Eight Facebook Lounges,
Seven papers-a-writing,
Six quizzes-a-taking,
Five APA cites,
Four perfect grades,
Three next term’s classes,
Two Webinars,
And a link to the ATSC.

On the ninth day of Christmas,
Everest sent to me
Nine chapters-a-reading,
Eight Facebook Lounges,
Seven papers-a-writing,
Six quizzes-a-taking,
Five APA cites,
Four perfect grades,
Three next term’s classes,
Two Webinars,
And a link to the ATSC.

On the tenth day of Christmas,
Everest sent to me
Ten videos-a-watching,
Nine chapters-a-reading,
Eight Facebook Lounges,
Seven papers-a-writing,
Six quizzes-a-taking,
Five APA cites,
Four perfect grades,
Three next term’s classes,
Two Webinars,
And a link to the ATSC.

On the eleventh day of Christmas,
Everest sent to me

Eleven individual homeworks,
Ten videos-a-watching,
Nine chapters-a-reading,
Eight Facebook Lounges,
Seven papers-a-writing,
Six quizzes-a-taking,
Five APA cites,
Four perfect grades,
Three next term’s classes,
Two Webinars,
And a link to the ATSC.

On the twelfth day of Christmas,
Everest sent to me
Twelve weeks-in-a-term,
Eleven individual homeworks,
Ten videos-a-watching,
Nine chapters-a-reading,
Eight Facebook Lounges,
Seven papers-a-writing,
Six quizzes-a-taking,
Five APA cites,
Four perfect grades,
Three next term’s classes,
Two Webinars,
And a link to the ATSC!

The Twelve Days of Everest

© Everest University Online | Written by: James Nemeth